mandag den 27. september 2010

A Short Lesson on Tuxfordry

No, you hadn´t heard the term tuxfordry before, had you?

I hope I was the one who coined it, and I am quite proud of it. Tuxfordry. Sounds nice and convincing, I think. Some branch of human science, perhaps?

Well, to be honest I just changed the name of one of my Cosy Knave characters. Seems like I do that all the time, but then it is so very simple. You just tell Word that now you don´t want Theodore to be Theodore any more; his new name is Tuxford. Easy-cheesy.

And next you are smart enough to remember that you used the short form Theo once in a while. So you change that ... and oops.

18 kommentarer:

Rayna M. Iyer sagde ...

I once had a boss who decided I had to replace all the 'will's in a report would 'would's. Easy peasy with Word at your service, I thought. Luckily I questioned why one of the signatories was "Wouldiam" before printing it out!
Fantastic Theory this.

Dorte H sagde ...

Rayna: I think Wouldiam is a perfect name!
But isn´t it just too bad that with all those smart computer programmes you still have to use your little grey cells?

Margot Kinberg sagde ...

Dorte - I like that new term~!!!! And I know all about going back through and making sure all of the little "fallout" from changing a name gets taken care of. Now, since you coined the word, what does it mean?

Dorte H sagde ...

Margot: that´s easy.
Tuxfordry = the philosophy of selecting a name that suits the character´s looks and personality.

For parents, you can only hope your child will grow into the name, but for writers you carry the huge responsibility of naming each and every character so no reader will think, "how could she call that man Theodore, he is obviously a Tuxford."

C. N. Nevets sagde ...

I think all I read on this post was, "Hey, check out this picture of English cheese. Aren't you hungry? Yes, you are."

Dorte H sagde ...

Nevet: most of my Cosy Knave characters are extremely sweet and edible.

I have wondered whether the story will get me some sponsor deals or if readers will sue me because they put on weight.

Clarissa Draper sagde ...

I love the name. I have a Theo in my book as well.

CD

....Petty Witter sagde ...

Tuxfordry? I like it, it has a certain ring to it.

Dorte H sagde ...

Tracy: yes, there must be someone out there who needs it.

Alexandra Crocodile sagde ...

So Tuxfordry is when you use Word (or similar) to change a character's name, have I got it right? Fantastisk, jeg tror jeg kommer til å bruke dette begrepet mye:)

Dorte H sagde ...

Alexandra: Yes, if that is what we want it to mean!

Cathryn Grant sagde ...

Thanks for a mid day laugh!

Vanda Symon sagde ...

I used Word to change a character's name from Chris to Leo, but forgot how often Sam Shephard blasphemes and uses the Lord's name in vain. Consequently she suddenly started saying Jesus Leot!

Kelly sagde ...

Well how about that! I learn something new every day! Actually, there are many things I don't know about Word, I'm sure.

I like the name Tuxford. It has a very distinguished sound to it!

Dorte H sagde ...

Cathryn: you´re welcome :D

Vanda: oh, that was what you did. I remembered your post which was partly why I wrote this one.

Kelly: Tuxford will be very pleased to hear that. When you run out of money, it is good to have something else ;)

Heather sagde ...

great definition.

Care sagde ...

Tuxfordry sounds like a reference to some high class political group. "In recent news, the Tuxfordry of Down Willinghamsville are now requiring those who drive automobiles older than 4 yrs to park in the back lot and not on directly Main Street."

Dorte H sagde ...

Heather: thank you!

Care: I *knew* the term would come in handy!